September 26, 2022

Everything Sucks! – TV Review

Everything Sucks! is the latest Netflix Original series that uses nostalgia and amazing writing to deliver a fantastic new series that is bound to go viral
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Everything Sucks! is an American comedy-drama web television series created by Ben York Jones and Michael Mohan that parodies teen culture of the mid-1990s. Ten half-hour episodes were ordered by Netflix and the series was released on February 16, 2018. The series is set in the real-life town of Boring, Oregon in 1996, and focuses on a group of teenagers who attend the fictional Boring High School as they proceed to make a movie together while dealing with issues such as dating and sexuality.
Everything Sucks! will draw you in with its quaint 90’s references, it’s nostalgic and yet awesome soundtrack that covers a multitude of genres from Oasis to Tori Amos, Spin Doctors to The Cardigans.
The series begins with main character Luke and his two nerdy friends McQuaid and Tyler as they begin their first day of high school with excitement and hope. An often overused trope but one that is employed well in Everything Sucks!.

The genius to Everything Sucks! is the character arcs and the amazing writing. Luke’s story over 10 episodes is full of ups and downs, twist and turns as well as dealing with heavy subjects such as sexuality, friendship, family and loss.  It isn’t just the main character Luke who goes on this journey but EVERY single character in the show.
Each character whether a support character or a minor bit part each has their own arc, their own problems to deal with and by the end of the 10 half-hour episodes every character has either matured, learnt something, grown or is comfortable with their place in the world.
It is this amazing writing that makes Everything Sucks! a wonderful gem of binge-watching TV that is quickly becoming the hallmark of Netflix originals. Many will make the comparison between  Stranger Things and Everything Sucks! due to the similarity of the main characters and its nostalgia but this has more of a John Hughes/ Breakfast Club feel that is implemented so well.
 

 
The writing of the characters, the development of relationships and the coming of age realisation each character faces is so sublime that the actual main plot of the series becomes the secondary arc at times as each character takes their turn to shine and grow.
By the end of the series you feel like you know and love each and every one of them, you can relate as you remember your own teenage years and THAT final scene means you will be craving for season 2 to arrive as soon as it can…
Overall Score 9/10